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20121201
20121201
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
as ecstasy. >> some part of you is on guard. it just wouldn't stop, couldn't shut it down. >> for rachel hope the mental agony began in childhood, when she says she was abused and raped. for a grown-up, a familiar smell would bring it all back. >> i would get very extreme stabbing sensations in my body, and like fixed visuals, like being, for instance, raped. >> reporter: mental breakdowns, four times in the hospital. and along the way she tried almost every treatment in the book. >> i tried endr, rapid eye movement therapy, nothing worked. >> reporter: and then she discovered an experiment. run by a psychiatrist in charleston, south carolina. >> this is a place where we do the study, meet with people and do the sessions. >> reporter: intense therapy, including eight-hour sessions after taking a capsule of mdma, of ecstasy. now listen closely on this tape, you can hear rachel with the doctor. >> it felt as if my whole brain was powered up like a christmas tree. all at once? >> sometimes people usually did have very positive affirming experience, but a lot of times it was revisiting the trauma
tonight. >>> that's "the ed show" on this friday night. "the rachel maddow show" starts right now. good evening, rachel. >> good evening, ed. have a great weekend, my friend. >> i will. you too. thank you. do you remember the color-coded alert system we used to have? remember that? tom ridge announced the exist tense of our national color-coded be afraid alert chart about a decade ago. we could tell at a glance how alert we were supposed to feel. and if you didn't feel like glancing at the be alert chart, at least a at the airport they would read periodic recorded statements over the intercom telling you out loud that today's threat level was orange. the threat level was always orange at the airport no matter what else was going on in the country. we don't do that anymore. we don't do that. we got rid of the chart thing last year and nobody complained. we also no longer have this. this is the google street view of one of the secret prisons we used to have in romania. the associated press did an overhead satellite view so you could see how snubbed up it was against the railway lines in a
us being exposed to diesel exhaust, and so with you mentioned this gal, rachel, is she the person who's not here today, or when you were talking about the air quality, having your air quality tested, and the odd thing is now a different agency runs and maintains these pumps that are right beneath us now so it gets kind of complicated, but i think i've been exposed, i worked at the airport for 11 years and then worked here, i have this exposure to diesel smell that you don't notice it here, i do notice it frequently, and so when you mention this gal rachel. >> so, just before this, we had a meeting because we're working on hopefully building a study to look at exposures among women in the fire course to understand what they're exposed to, this raises a really interesting kind of unique sub population within that, she is an environmental health scientist and has done a lot of work on measuring levels of chemicals in people and environments, so one study she did was with also in richmond california to looking at the different levels of chemicals, diesel exhaust in richmond which you wou
. could not shut it down. >> for rachel hope, the mental agony began in childhood, when she says she was abused and raped at age four. as a grown-up, the smallest trigger like a familiar smell would bring it all back. >> i would get very extreme stabbing sensations in my body, and then like fixed visuals, like being, for instance, raped. >> mental breakdowns, in the hospital four times, along the way she tried every type of treatment. >> tried rapid movement therapy, fish therapy, yell it out, scream it out. you know? nothing worked. >> and then she discovered an experiment, run by dr. michael midhoffer, a psychiatrist in south carolina. >> this is the study, the place where we meet with people. >> the intense psychotherapy, after intense sessions, after taking a capsule of ecstasy, now listen, on this tape you can hear rachel along with the doctor. >> it felt as if my whole brain was powered up like a christmas tree. all at once. >> sometimes usually people did have some very positive or affirming experiences. but a lot of the times it was revisiting the trauma. it was painful, a di
think we don't really know here, rachel, until we hear from the administration. this is raising a question, people are going to be pressing the administration in the next couple of days to say, can you give us more specifics? is this the start of a new way of thinking and maybe new policies that will be unfolding in the next couple of months? let's say. or is this a trial balloon and you're seeing how it looks and how people react to it and it may fall under the category of we're trying, and here you're catching us trying, but not much is going to happen. the fact is if there's another terrorist attack in the the united states, many of these issues go right back to where we were back to the restart button. and be clear, under the article 2 powers of the presidency, this president can do a great deal. pretty much everything he does now and then some. the key issue is guantanamo. those prisoners, 166 prisoners including 50 hard-core, the president said we don't know what we're going to do with those people. they would be sitting without a legal framework if we pull back from this
, sharl patton is back there, give a wave, and did rachel step out already? and rachel thought she was going to give a wave but she had to step out to go to another meeting, from the breast cancer fund, we have my two science leaders, [inaudible] and janet gray, so science questions galor, they can handle them all, policy questions, we'll have to deflect some of those to nancy for another time, so what i'm going to present today is what we call our healthy home and healthy world tours, i'll talk a little bit about who the breast cancer fund is and then we're going to walk through kind of the rooms in your home talking about tips for avoiding exposures that are linked to breast cancer and i will talk a little bit about the different chemicals, where they're found, things you can do to avoid them and also some policies, and then we'll kind of go beyond the home to talk about the kinds of exposures that might be not within our control in the house but elsewhere. and it looks like i have videos so that is good. so, the breast cancer fund is a national organization that works to prevent
not understood], and rachel tom. the next speaker? >>> hello, my name is [speaker not understood]. we have to leave so i wonder if i'm going to be able to read her comment in addition to my own. >> you'll have to squeeze it into your own time. >>> i'll read mine first. i think it might be short. my name is [speaker not understood]. i'm a san francisco state environmental studies major and i also live in district 1. san francisco's precautionary principle resolution states that the city has an obligation to consider a full range of alternatives. the recreation and parks department's failure to consider [speaker not understood] all alternatives to the sharp park golf course reenvironment plan violation of san francisco's precautionary principle resolution. buried on page 527 of the last page of the draft e-i-r, it is stated that the registration alternatives were rejected because they were not compatible with the existing and planned 18-hole layout of the historic golf course. the recommended management actions for the sharp park in the draft e-i-r do not refer to a planned 18-hole layout. h
for androgel 1.62%. what are you waiting for? this is big news. >>> we play that music. we bring in rachel smith, our entertainment reporter. but rachel's off this morning. very happy to have ginger zee. >> i love stories about bieber and lohan, almost as much as i love the troposphere. we're very lucky. >> will you define troposphere in the course of this "pop news"? >> probably not. i'm going to do something that you're going to like. there's going to be a "family guy" movie. big applause, everyone. seth macfarlane, slipped with the news to a bunch of students at ucla. he says he has a concept for the film. and it's only a matter before it gets made. there is a contest for film students while doing all this. six winners will get to join seth on stage and actually hand out oscars. you will get to see the trophy-toting coeds on abc in february. exciting stuff. >>> now, breaking news. are you ready for this? johnny depp is hot. and he plays guitar, which makes it even hotter. he recently joined alice cooper's concert in los angeles. the sexy pirate jufred in on a few covers, includes "foxy
to cut a deal today, by the time he was back on capitol hill, if shawn kennedy or rachel maddow did not like it, switchboards light up. it makes it difficult for members. one other factor has come in. these are not what i would call efforts to bring us together. these make it more difficult to get things, rise. if a speaker were to go off and cut a deal, if rachel maddow did not like it, member's phones light up like a christmas tree. it makes it difficult for members. there is one other fact that is not talked about as much but it's equally important. that is the fact that campaign financing has changed. we have passed landmark campaign finance reform. i did not vote for it, i am happy to say. the difficulty with that is its tries to take money out of politics. it limited money to parties who limited how they could make money. that money did not disappear from the political process. it moved and now it is out in super pacs. you have more money now coming from third-party groups then you do from political parties and candidates combined. what does that mean in the mind of a policy m
-- >> i think this would be a great question for rachel, she's done a lot of oil and soil sampling and monitoring and she's familiar with the labs that work in this area and would be able to give you a lot of support and help. >> thank you. >> okay. >> so, shall we open it to wider questions. we have about 10, 15, 20 minutes. >> so, this may sound a little weird to come from someone with the breast cancer fund but i want to say everything that connie said could be breast cancer but it could also be loads of other diseases so what she's talking about really is not just concerns about one of the very worst diseases to which too many of us succumb, but we're also talking about neurodegenerative diseases, asthma, developmental disorders, other reproductive -- infertility, miscarriage, all kinds of other disorders, so horrible as breast cancer is, it's really one in a whole spectrum are affected by these chemical processes. i wanted to add that. >> hi. one thing i thought would be really good to have within fire house iss to get rid of antibacterial soap which often contains triclocan,
commissioners, i know with vice president rachel norton, sandy -- stepped with us on the steps today for the cities to step up and support the most vulnerable high school students that are in danger of not graduating, i think about 1900 students as the chronicle stmed two days ago. but i am sensitive to supervisor campos' comments about the potential threats to the rainy day fund and imhoping with the week's continuance that we try to work on this issue. i know -- lee, one of the -- and sf usd has developed an action plan to make sure students have potential to meet a through g, csu requirements that we support as many people as we can with not only after school programs but on line and other types of supplemental support so that we maximize our support so we make sure students don't fall through the cracks and they could earn their diplomas for high school. i agree with supervisor olague that this is a issue about equity. it's about supporting not only african-american and latino high learner high school students as well and i think it's an important effort that we make a statement
to student loans? are they out there? joining us is rachel cruise financial speaker and writer for the dave ramsey organization. good to have you this morning. >> good to -- thanks for having me. >> all righty. so these federal lending programs are designed to make college education more affordable. basically what's happening is creating a pile of debt. >> that's right. so many students are believing the lie that you can't be a student without a student loan. so they are just assuming student loans are are the only way to go to college. >> seems obvious what the down sides would be but let's put them up on the screen how are people winding up with so much debt? are there things they don't realize going into it. >> i think so. an 18-year-old doesn't con piewt that they may graduate with $27,000 in debt. that's just. >> or more. >> that's just the average. >> and more. the average is coming out to $27,000. i don't think an 18-year-old really realizes how much money that actually is. which brings us to point 2. i feel like if i talk to the 21-year-old version of them they always say i wish i h
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)